State Highpoints
17/50.

It all started when I went to the highest point in Indiana for a mountain-loving ex-girlfriend. The rural roads and the obscurity of Hoosier Hill led me to gradually checking out other highpoints while on road trips. While I doubt I'll ever do Granite Peak, nevermind Denali, I've enjoyed getting the 16 I have so far :)

Difficulty 1 (9/21) - Drive-ups and highpoints with vertical gains of no more than 130 feet and less than 0.6 miles round trip from car.

Alabama Cheaha Mountain nil gain < 0.1 mile 2,405 ft  
4
Delaware Ebright Azimuth nil gain < 0.1 mile 448 ft October 2009
Florida Britton Hill nil gain < 0.1 mile 345 ft  
Illinois Charles Mound 75 ft gain 0.4 mile 1,235 ft  
1
Indiana Hoosier Hill 20 ft gain 0.1 mile 1,257 ft October 2005
8
Iowa Hawkeye Point nil gain 0.2 mile 1,670 ft July 2010
Kansas Mt. Sunflower nil gain < 0.1 mile 4,039 ft  
Kentucky Black Mountain nil gain 0.1 mile 4,139 ft  
Massachusetts Mt. Greylock 20 ft gain 0.1 mile 3,487 ft  
Mississippi Woodall Mountain nil gain < 0.1 mile 806 ft  
17
Missouri Taum Sauk Mountain 30 ft gain 0.4 mile 1,772 ft April 2015
Nebraska Panorama Point nil gain < 0.1 mile 5,424 ft  
New Hampshire Mt. Washington 20 ft gain < 0.1 mile 6,288 ft  
10
New Jersey High Point 40 ft gain 0.2 mile 1,803 ft August 2010
North Carolina Mt. Mitchell 100 ft gain 0.2 mile 6,684 ft  
5
Ohio Campbell Hill nil gain < 0.1 mile 1,549 ft October 2009
16
Pennsylvania Mt. Davis nil gain < 0.1 mile 3,213 ft September 2013
3
Rhode Island Jerimoth Hill 25 ft gain 0.6 mile 812 ft July 2008
South Carolina Sassafras Mountain 30 ft gain 0.2 mile 3,560 ft  
West Virginia Spruce Knob 20 ft gain 0.4 mile 1,951 ft  
9
Wisconsin Timms Hill 130 ft gain 0.4 mile 1,951 ft July 2010

Difficulty 2 (4/7) - Highpoints with vertical gains of 150-400 feet and from 0.4 to 2.0 miles round trip from car.

6
Arkansas Magazine Mountain 225 ft gain 1.0 mile 2,753 ft June 2010
Georgia Brasstown Bald 400 ft gain 1.0 mile 4,784 ft  
15
Hawaii Mauna Kea 230 ft gain 0.4 mile 13,796 ft April 2013
12
Louisiana Driskill Mountain 150 ft gain 1.8 miles 535 ft February 2012
14
Michigan Mt. Arvon 300 ft gain 2.0 miles 1,979 ft September 2012
North Dakota White Butte 400 ft gain 2.0 miles 3,506 ft
Tennessee Clingmans Dome 330 ft gain 1.0 mile 6,643 ft

Class 3 (0/3) - Highpoints with vertical gains of 450-750 feet and from 2.2 to 3.6 miles round trip from car.

Connecticut Mt. Frissell, S slope 450 ft gain 3.6 miles 2,380 ft
Maryland Backbone Mountain 750 ft gain 2.2 miles 3,360 ft
Vermont Mt. Mansfield 550 ft gain 2.8 miles 4,393 ft

Class 4 (1/4) - Highpoints with vertical gains of 600-1,500 feet and from 5.8 to 8.6 miles round trip from car.

Minnesota Eagle Mountain 600 ft gain 7.0 miles 2,301 ft
Oklahoma Black Mesa 775 ft gain 8.6 miles 4,973 ft
7
South Dakota Harney Peak 1,500 ft gain 5.8 miles 7,242 ft July 2010
Virginia Mt. Rogers 1,500 ft gain 8.6 miles 5,729 ft

Class 5 (2/3) - Highpoints with vertical gains of 2,950-4,200 feet and from 8.4 to 14.8 miles round trip from car.

2
Maine Mt. Katahdin 4,200 ft gain 10.4 miles 5,267 ft October 2007
New York Mt. Marcy 3,200 ft gain 14.8 miles 5,344 ft
13
Texas Guadalupe Peak 2,950 ft gain 8.4 miles 8,749 ft February 2012

Class 6 (1/4) - Highpoints with vertical gains of 3,250-5,000 feet, from 6.2 to 9.0 miles round trip from car, and with summits over 12,633 feet.

Arizona Humphreys Peak 3,500 ft gain 9.0 miles 12,633 ft
11
Colorado Mt. Elbert 5,000 ft gain 9.0 miles 14,433 ft September 2010
New Mexico Wheeler Peak 3,250 ft gain 6.2 miles 13,161 ft
Nevada Boundary Peak 4,400 ft gain 7.4 miles 13,140 ft

Class 7 (0/2) - Highpoints with vertical gains of 5,350-6,750 feet, from 21.4 to 28.8 miles round trip from car, with summits over 13,528 feet, and likely requiring more than one day to summit and return.

California Mt. Whitney 6,750 ft gain 21.4 miles 14,494 ft
Utah Kings Peak 5,350 ft gain 28.8 miles 13,528 ft

Class 8 (0/2) - Highpoints with vertical gains of 5,300 feet, from 6.8 to 8.0 miles round trip from car, with summits over 11,239 feet, and requiring handholds and/or the use of ropes.

Idaho: Borah Peak - Highpoint with a vertical gain of 5,550 feet, 6.8 miles round trip from car, and summit elevation of 12,662 feet. Handholds are used for some climbing and some individuals may wish rope belays because of exposure.

Oregon: Mt. Hood - Highpoint with a vertical gain of 5,300 feet, 8.0 miles round trip from car, and summit elevation of 11,239 feet. There is climbing on snow fields and glaciers where ropes are required.

Class 9 (0/3) - Highpoints with vertical gains of 7,000-9,100 feet, from 16.0 to 40.4 miles round trip from car, with summits over 12,799 feet, and requiring technical skill on rock and glacier where ropes are required.

Montana: Granite Peak - Highpoint with a vertical gain of 7,700 feet, 22.2 miles round trip from car, and summit elevation of 12,799 feet. Rock climbing is required and ropes are needed for at least two to three pitches for safety.

Washington: Mt. Rainier - Highpoint with a vertical gain of 9,100 feet, 16.0 miles round trip from car, and summit elevation of 14,410 feet. There is climbing on snow fields and glaciers where ropes are required.

Wyoming: Gannett Peak - Highpoint with a vertical gain of 8,650 feet, 40.4 miles round trip from car, and summit elevation of 13,804 feet. There is climbing on snow fields and glaciers where ropes are required.

Class 10 (0/1) - Highpoint with a vertical gain of 24,500 feet, 46.0 miles round trip from base camp, summit elevation of 20,320 feet, and requiring technical skills for glacier travel where ropes are required.

Alaska: Mt. McKinley (Denali) - "A bush pilot is normally used to fly into base camp on the Kahiltna glacier (West Buttress route). "Carries" are used to move gear and supplies to high camp (usually 17,200 feet). A "carry" is when supplies are moved to a higher elevation, cached, and then the team returns to the previous camp to sleep. The next day, weather permitting, the team moves up to the cache and sets up a new camp. This procedure is repeated several times when climbing the mountain. The elevation difference between base camp (7,200) and the summit (20,320) is 13,120 feet. However, because of "carries," the route to high camp is usually done twice. Therefore, the elevation gain is approximately 24,500 feet. The distance from base camp to the summit is 16 miles. Again, because of the "carries" the actual distance covered is about 46 miles. Climbing is on glaciers, under extreme conditions, where ropes are required at all times. Extensive preparation, equipment, supplies and teamwork are required. Denali is the highpoint of North America."


Table and Difficulty from "Highpointing - Summiting United States Highpoints" in Future Focus, Ohio Journal of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance, 28:1:29-33, Spring/Summer, 1997.

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